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Think You May Have Hearing Loss? Here Is What To Do

477 million: that’s the number of people worldwide who live with hearing loss. Among people 75 and older, nearly half have hearing loss. These numbers make it clear that hearing loss is far from uncommon, and it can happen to anyone. So, if you think you might have hearing loss, what should you do?
Here are six simple steps you should take if you think you have hearing loss:
        1) Know the signs.
While every person experiences hearing loss a little differently, there are common symptoms you can watch out for to know whether you may have hearing loss. Common signs of hearing loss include:

  • Frequently asking people to repeat themselves
  • Turning the TV or music to a volume that other people find loud
  • Difficulty understanding conversation in noisy places
  • Trouble hearing women’s and children’s voices
  • Difficulty hearing on the phone
  • Feeling like other people are frequently mumbling
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Avoiding social situations you once enjoyed
  • Other people, such as your spouse, friends, or family members, telling you that you might have hearing loss

      2) Have your hearing tested.
If you have noticed the signs of hearing loss, or if a loved one has suggested you might have hearing loss, the next step is to have your hearing tested. You can start with an online test (many online hearing tests are free), or you can go to a hearing health professional. The benefit of seeing a professional for a hearing test is they will be able to explain your results and what action should be taken.
        3) Decide whether you want to treat your hearing loss.
If the results of your hearing test reveal that you do have hearing loss, it is time to decide what you’re going to do about it. You could ignore the problem, but this is not recommended. The effects of untreated hearing loss include social ones, like not hearing important information, feeling lonely when you cannot have conversations as you once did, mishearing conversations (especially in noisy environments), and feeling frustrated in social situations. Untreated hearing loss can also affect your overall health; those with untreated hearing loss are at a greater risk for depression, anxiety, falls, and dementia.
Treating your hearing loss, on the other hand, can lower your risk for all of these problems. It can also help you enjoy auditory experiences you may have forgotten about, like hearing the birds outside your window or the babbling sound of the little stream that runs alongside your favorite nature walk. You will also be able to understand conversations with your loved ones and feel comfortable and confident in social situations.
     4) See a hearing professional.
If you did not see a hearing health professional for your hearing test, now is the time to schedule an appointment with an audiologist, hearing aid specialist, or ENT. The hearing professional will be able to determine how severe the hearing loss is and recommend the best treatment for your specific needs.
     5) Ask to try hearing aids.
Hearing aids are a common and effective way to treat hearing loss. Did you know that most states require a 30- or 60-day trial period for hearing aids? This allows you enough time to try out your hearing aids and see how they are working for you. Your hearing professional will help you with any adjustments you need, and they can also recommend different hearing aids if you feel you didn’t get the right fit the first time.
Although over-the-counter hearing aids are now available, the best choice is often to get personalized ones from a hearing professional. With this option, your hearing professional can make certain that the hearing aids are tailored to your specific needs and preferences.
   6) Enjoy hearing well.
Most people who try hearing aids report that they enjoy many activities so much more now—from listening to music to conversing with friends, and from hearing the sounds of nature to watching TV without turning the volume up to the max. In addition, you can rest assured that you have lowered your risk for the health problems associated with untreated hearing loss. Now, that’s something to celebrate!
If you would like more information or think you might have hearing loss, we invite you to contact our hearing practice today. We look forward to taking care of you.

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New Study Confirms Link Between COVID-19 and Symptoms of Hearing Loss, Tinnitus, and Vertigo

Now that we have been dealing with the global COVID-19 pandemic for over a year now, you have probably learned that symptoms of COVID can vary from person to person. Some people experience difficulty breathing, while others only suffer from a loss of taste or smell. Some people experience nausea or vomiting, while others have a fever and chills.
You may also know that certain viruses can lead to hearing difficulties, including measles, mumps, and meningitis. But what about the coronavirus? Could one of the varying symptoms of COVID-19 be an effect on your hearing? A new study found that yes, there is a link between COVID-19 and symptoms of hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo.
Tinnitus is the most common hearing symptom reported by those suffering from COVID-19. Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is a fairly common condition on its own, with nearly 15 percent of the population (approximately 50 million Americans) experiencing some form of tinnitus. Most people who experience tinnitus also have hearing loss, which suggests a close link between the two conditions. Researchers suspect that tinnitus is one of the first signs that the hearing system has been damaged by factors like excessive noise or ototoxic drugs.
Tinnitus has been reported to be a common symptom of what is referred to as “long COVID,” which is where symptoms persist weeks or even months after the infection is gone. The exact connection between tinnitus and COVID-19 is unclear. It may be that the virus affects the auditory system, or tinnitus may be caused by stress from the pandemic.
While tinnitus is most frequently reported by those suffering from long COVID, hearing difficulties have been reported by patients of a wide age range who experienced the illness in varying degrees of severity. Hearing loss has been reported among those with mild cases that were managed as home, as well as among severe cases that required hospitalization. There have also been several reports of sudden hearing loss in one ear, accompanied by tinnitus, from patients with COVID-19.
Research has found that viruses can cause sudden hearing loss, so SARS-CoV-2 may be responsible for the cases of sudden hearing loss reported in COVID patients. However, because of the high number of COVID patients worldwide, it is difficult for researchers to determine whether the rate of sudden hearing loss is higher than normal.
Many COVID patients also report dizziness as a symptom of the disease. Dizziness may be difficult to differentiate from rotatory vertigo, which is caused by damage to the balance system in the inner ear. The best estimate from current surveys and reports is that rotatory vertigo occurs in approximately 7 percent of COVID cases.
From these reports, it is clear that COVID-19 is linked to hearing difficulties, including hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Further research is needed to more fully establish the connection and the true cause of these symptoms. To learn more about how COVID and hearing problems are linked, we invite you to contact our hearing clinic today. We are eager to assist you.